Documentation > Installation > Other distros

Jool Installation

Index

  1. Introduction
  2. Updating your system
  3. Installing Dependencies
  4. Downloading the Code
  5. Compilation and Installation
  6. Uninstalling

Introduction

A full installation of Jool is eleven binaries:

  • Kernel modules:
    • jool.ko, jool_siit.ko and jool_common.ko: The Stateful NAT64, the SIIT and the functionality that is shared between the previous two. They are the actual translators and do most of the work.
  • Userspace tools:
    • jool and jool_siit: Two console clients which can be used to configure the modules above.
    • joold: An userspace daemon that can synchronize state between different NAT64 Jool instances.
  • Userspace libraries:
    • libxt_JOOL.so and libxt_JOOL_SIIT.so: Two shared objects that enable Jool-themed iptables rules.
    • libjoolargp.la, libjoolnl.la and libjoolutil.la (extensions may vary): Three shared libraries containing common functionality for the other userspace components.

This document will explain how to compile and install all of that on most Linux distributions.

In following console segments, $ indicates the command can be executed freely; # means it requires admin privileges.

Updating your system

This is not always necessary, but aside from fetching security patches, it maximizes the probability of easily acquiring the proper kernel headers later.

Debian CentOS openSUSE Arch
user@T:~# apt update
user@T:~# apt upgrade
user@T:~# yum update
 
user@T:~# zypper update
 
user@T:~# pacman -Syy
user@T:~# pacman -Su

If you got a new kernel, best load it:

user@T:~# /sbin/reboot

Installing Dependencies

Of course, I can’t list exact dependencies for every single distribution, but here is a small list compiled from previous troubleshooting experiences. It should at least get you started if your environment is different.

This section was last revised in 2020-01-08, using the following Linux flavors:

  • Debian 10.2 (cat /etc/debian_version)
  • Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS (lsb_release -a, cat /etc/os-release, hostnamectl)
  • Raspberri Pi Desktop (Debian Buster) September 2019 (This is just the name of the ISO; Raspberri does not seem to have a dedicated version string. /etc/os-release refers to Debian 10 and /etc/debian_version says 10.2.)
  • CentOS 7.7.1908 (Core) (cat /etc/system-release, cat /etc/centos-release)
  • OpenSUSE Leap 15.1 (cat /usr/lib/os-release)
  • Arch Linux 5.4.8-arch1-1 (Found at the top of the login prompt. Might not be the right one, because it’s the same as uname -r. Dunno; can’t find a better string.)

For Ubuntu and Raspberri, use the Debian tabs.

First, you need your build essentials:

Debian CentOS openSUSE Arch
user@T:~# apt install build-essential pkg-config
user@T:~# yum install gcc make elfutils-libelf-devel
user@T:~# zypper install gcc
user@T:~# pacman -S base-devel

The modules need your kernel headers (and make sure your kernel is supported by your version of Jool):

Debian CentOS openSUSE Arch
user@T:~# apt install linux-headers-$(uname -r)
user@T:~# yum install kernel-devel
user@T:~# # Unneeded
user@T:~# pacman -S linux-headers

The userspace clients and the daemon need the Development Library and Headers for libnl-genl-3:

Debian CentOS openSUSE Arch
user@T:~# apt install libnl-genl-3-dev
user@T:~# yum install libnl3-devel
user@T:~# zypper install libnl3-devel
user@T:~# # Installed by default, apparently

The iptables shared objects need the Netfilter xtables Library development files:

Debian CentOS openSUSE Arch
user@T:~# apt install libxtables-dev # It's called iptables-dev in Ubuntu 16.04
user@T:~# yum install iptables-devel
user@T:~# zypper install libxtables-devel
user@T:~# # Installed by default, apparently

You also want DKMS, for automatic module rebuild during kernel updates:

Debian CentOS openSUSE Arch
user@T:~# apt install dkms
user@T:~# # https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/EPEL
user@T:~# yum install https://dl.fedoraproject.org/pub/epel/epel-release-latest-7.noarch.rpm
user@T:~# yum install dkms
user@T:~# zypper install dkms
user@T:~# pacman -S dkms

If you’re going to clone the git repository, you need git and the autotools:

Debian CentOS openSUSE Arch
user@T:~# apt install git autoconf libtool
user@T:~# yum install git automake libtool
user@T:~# zypper install git-core automake autoconf libtool
user@T:~# pacman -S git # autotools already included in base-devel.

And if you don’t, you will need a .tar.gz extraction tool. Most distros include this by default, but just for completeness sake,

Debian CentOS openSUSE Arch
user@T:~# apt install tar
user@T:~# yum install tar
user@T:~# zypper install tar
user@T:~# pacman -S tar

Downloading the Code

You have two options:

  1. Official tarballs hosted at Downloads.
  2. Cloning the Git repository.
tarballs git clone
$ wget https://jool.mx/download/jool-4.1.5.tar.gz
$ tar -xzf jool-4.1.5.tar.gz
$ git clone https://github.com/NICMx/Jool.git
 

The repository version sometimes includes slight bugfixes not present in the latest official tarball, which you can access by sticking to the latest commit of the master branch. (Tarballs and master are considered stable, other branches are development.)

Compilation and Installation

Warning! Please note: If you have previously installed Jool from a package (.deb or otherwise), the binaries installed here will not necessarily override them. It supposedly depends on distro, but Source Jool and package Jool tend to be installed in different locations by default. This means that, if you’ve previously installed from a package, both versions will coexist in your system, and the one you actually run will not necessarily be the one you expect.

To minimize confusion, it is strongly recommended that you uninstall package Jool before proceeding.

The kernel modules and the userspace applications need to be compiled and installed separately.

This is how you compile and install the kernel modules:

tarball git clone
user@T:~# /sbin/dkms install jool-4.1.5/
user@T:~# /sbin/dkms install Jool/

And this is how you compile and install the userspace applications:

tarball git clone
user@T:~$ cd jool-4.1.5/
user@T:~$
user@T:~$ ./configure
user@T:~$ make
user@T:~# make install
user@T:~$ cd Jool/
user@T:~$ ./autogen.sh
user@T:~$ ./configure
user@T:~$ make
user@T:~# make install

Uninstalling

Userspace Clients

Simply run make uninstall in the directory where you compiled them:

user@T:~$ cd jool-4.1.5/
user@T:~# make uninstall

If you no longer have the directory where you compiled them, download it again and do this instead:

tarball git clone
user@T:~$ cd jool-4.1.5/
user@T:~$
user@T:~$ ./configure
user@T:~# make uninstall
user@T:~$ cd Jool/
user@T:~$ ./autogen.sh
user@T:~$ ./configure
user@T:~# make uninstall

Kernel Modules (if installed by DKMS)

Use dkms remove. Here’s an example in which I’m trying to remove version 4.0.1:

$ /sbin/dkms status
jool, 4.0.1.git.v4.0.1, 4.15.0-54-generic, x86_64: built
jool, 4.0.6.git.v4.0.6, 4.15.0-54-generic, x86_64: installed
$
$ sudo /sbin/dkms remove jool/4.0.1.git.v4.0.1 --all

-------- Uninstall Beginning --------
Module:  jool
Version: 4.0.1.git.v4.0.1
Kernel:  4.15.0-54-generic (x86_64)
-------------------------------------

Status: This module version was INACTIVE for this kernel.
depmod...

DKMS: uninstall completed.

------------------------------
Deleting module version: 4.0.1.git.v4.0.1
completely from the DKMS tree.
------------------------------
Done.
$
$ /sbin/dkms status
jool, 4.0.6.git.v4.0.6, 4.15.0-54-generic, x86_64: installed

Kernel Modules (if installed by Kbuild in accordance with old documentation)

Delete the .ko files and re-index by way of depmod:

$ sudo rm /lib/modules/$(uname -r)/extra/jool_siit.ko
$ sudo rm /lib/modules/$(uname -r)/extra/jool.ko
$ sudo rm -f /lib/modules/$(uname -r)/extra/jool_common.ko
$ sudo depmod